Teacher Tip: History Lesson

History Lesson Ideas

How can history class come alive?  Well, invite the historical figures to visit, of course. 

 

Please meet my friend, Hercules. 

hercules0023

Another friend, Poseidon.

poseidon_rep0271
Here’s Demeter.

 demeter1_25

Now meet Hermes.

hermes1008
One more friend is Cerberus.
cerberus10005

 Oh, I almost forgot I’m not sitting at the Parthenon in Greece.  My second grade friends are studying Geek mythology.

Tip:  Employ this idea to suit your curriculum.  Choose a unit, assign students a historical figure, and create a list of questions.  

 

Let’s make-up an example history lesson.

History Lesson:  The Constitution of the United States of America

 

1.  Choose the writers/signers of the constitution as a historical figure to study.  Assign one per student or allow choice.  (Tip:  I give any student who needs a boost-socially or educationally-the most coveted figure.  Then, I monitor the student’s progress to ensure success.)

2.  Contact parents and give a minimum of three weeks to prepare costumes (no need to be elaborate).  Include suggestions for the costumes and presentation guidelines (see 4). You’ll love the creativity birthed on presentation day.

3.  Research in class or as homework.  Be specific assigning the information you want students to report —the W’s and H.  Usually, I work on part of the assignment at school and part as homework.

4.  Decide format for presentations:  written report, oral report, and poster. 

5.  Invite parents to watch presentations.

6.  Send reminders to parents several times before presentation day. 

Other ideas: Study a unit with an older class and spend a theme day to culminate a unit:  play games, music, food, read, educational videos, and guests.

 

Please comment and share your history teaching tips.   

 poseido20

Your friend, DaVinci’s Classroom Teacher

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