Mothers and Teachers

(Note:  This is a true story.  Details spared and names changed to protect privacy.)

 

Mrs. B writes to DaVinci’s Classroom.  Her second grade son, Rob, is disinterested in school after loving school up to now.  His teachers report disruptive behavior, particularly in art class.  Rob observes school policies enforced for some of the children, but not all of the children.   “It’s unfair,” complains Rob.

 

After talking with Rob, Mrs. B believes his complaints legitimate and plans to confront administration.   What should her next step be?

 

DaVinci’s Classroom’s Tips

Communication is key: please remember to talk with the teacher first, before going to adminstration.

 

Home Work

1.      This is a marvelous opportunity to share one of life’s lessons—life is not fair.   Use respectful and age-appropriate dialogue to discuss this concept to help Rob understand.

 

2.  Continue the conversation to gather objective information.  As Rob talks, write his questions down. 

 

3.  Mirroring is an effective strategy, which may resolve the problem

     sometimes people need to talk and be heard.  Mirror everything Rob

     says by repeating his words. 

 

4.   Gently and firmly go over your expectations:  respect adults, obey school rules. 

 

School Work

   5.   If necessary, arrange a meeting with the teacher(s) and include Rob. Approach the meeting with a positive attitude.  During the meeting, allow Rob to lead the discussion using the questions written at home.   Be sure to prepare Rob for the meeting—“I want you to ask the questions, so we can understand what is happening.”   Often, this communication clarifies circumstances and the problem resolves.

 

6.   One more suggestion:  Attend school with Rob especially during art class if the disruptive behavior continues.  Your attention to Rob may settle everything. 

 

This is a starting point.  If handled well, Rob benefits by witnessing adults communicate maturely. 

 

TEACHERS:  If you would like to quote these tips in a newsletter, website, or blog please contact DaVinci’s Classroom for permission.

I’ll say, “Yes,”  as long as you list the blog and author.

Thanks, terri@devokids.com

 

secretary_type_aafun6d7a_m Altered Art Fun

 

 

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